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Men With Both Peyronie’s Disease and Erectile Dysfunction Have Surgical Options

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Men With Both Peyronie’s Disease and Erectile Dysfunction Have Surgical OptionsMany men with Peyronie’s disease also develop erectile dysfunction (ED – the inability to get an erection firm enough for sex). It’s possible to surgically treat both conditions, and a new study in Sexual Medicine describes some of the latest research in this area.

Peyronie’s disease is a connective tissue disorder thought to occur when an injury to the penis doesn’t heal properly. Instead, areas of hardened scar tissue called plaques form on the penis, just below the surface of the skin. The plaques make the penis less flexible and can cause deformities like a distinct curve or a “hinge” effect. Intercourse can become quite difficult.

Peyronie’s disease generally develops in two stages. During the first (acute) stage, men may notice their penis starting to bend, and pain is common. After six to twelve months, the chronic (stable) phase begins, when pain goes away and the curve remains stable.

Surgery to straighten the penis is a frequent treatment for men with Peyronie’s disease, but it often isn’t performed until the chronic stage. Men who develop ED along with Peyronie’s disease may opt for a penile prosthesis that allows them to have an erection when they wish by activating their implant.

For the study, researchers analyzed 58 studies related to Peyronie’s disease with co-existing ED.

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Men's Sex

Medication and Traction Help Men with Peyronie’s Disease

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Medication and Traction Help Men with Peyronie’s DiseaseMedication combined with traction therapy could offer men with Peyronie’s disease an effective, low-cost treatment option.

A recent study investigated the use of either pentoxifylline or colchicine, along with traction therapy, in 46 men with Peyronie’s disease.

Men with Peyronie’s disease develop deformities of the penis after plaques (areas of hardened scar tissue) from just under the surface of the skin. Often, there is a distinct curve that makes intercourse difficult. Men may also have pain and trouble with erections.

In addition to the physical symptoms, Peyronie’s disease can have a psychological impact. Men may become depressed or anxious about their sexual life.

For some patients, surgery to straighten the penis is the answer. However, that’s not an option for all men, and it isn’t always appropriate for men with milder cases of Peyronie’s. Injections of collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) is another treatment approach, but this path can be expensive.

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Similarities Found Among Transgender and Cisgender Children

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Similarities Found Among Transgender and Cisgender Children A child’s assigned gender at birth, and that child’s early birth gender experiences, don’t always mean a child will identify as that gender later on, according to new research in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

Currently, there are thousands of children who have socially transitioned from their birth gender to their preferred gender. During this process, some start using different names or pronouns. Many choose clothing, hair styles, and toys that are typically associated with their targeted gender.

The study is one of the first of its kind, as it investigates gender development in children who have experienced living as the gender they were assigned at birth and the preferred gender that they transitioned to.

Researchers compared three groups of children, who ranged in age from 3 to 12:

  • 317 transgender children (208 transgender girls and 109 transgender boys)
  • 189 cisgender siblings (82 girls and 107 boys) who were closest in age to the transgender children
  • 316 cisgender children who were not related to the transgender children or their siblings (207 girls and 109 boys)

(Note: The term transgender refers to people whose gender identity does not align with their assigned birth gender. For instance, transgender boys are genetically female, but identify as males. Transgender girls are genetically male, but identify as females. The term cisgender refers to people who identify as the gender that was assigned to them at birth.)

Members of the research team met with the children and their parents. The children underwent a series of tasks involving toys and clothing preferences. Children and parents also answered questions about gender identity.

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Many Doctors Not Trained in Post-Cancer Sex Health

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Many Doctors Not Trained in Post-Cancer Sex Health Cancer treatment can have many sexual side effects, including erectile dysfunction, low testosterone, and poor vaginal lubrication. But research suggests that healthcare providers often don’t discuss sex health after treatment with their patients.

Lack of time and lack of training are likely barriers to such discussions, researchers reported. Their findings were presented at the October 2019 meeting of the Sexual Medicine Society of North America (SMSNA). (Note: The SMSNA publishes the SexHealthMatters website.)

The research team sent a Sexual Health Attitudes Questionnaire to 88 oncologists and advance practice providers (APPs) to learn more about sex health conversations with patients. Thirteen healthcare providers responded.

Among this group, 31% said they “often” or “always” talked about sexual health with their patients, and just under a quarter reported “often” or “always” discussing sexual side effects of chemotherapy.

Almost half said they “rarely” or “never” referred their patients to a sex health professional if needed.

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