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Testosterone Auto-Injector Deemed Safe | SexHealthMatters.org

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Testosterone Auto-Injector Deemed SafeAn auto-injector used to administer testosterone enanthate “has a favorable safety profile and is well-tolerated,” according to a new journal of Sexual Medicine study.

The device offers a convenient option for men on testosterone replacement therapy, allowing them to self-administer their medicine at home.

Testosterone is a male sex hormone that gives men their masculine traits. It’s also important for sex drive and erections. When men have a testosterone deficiency, they may feel moody, fatigued, and less interested in sex. For some men, testosterone replacement therapy relieves those symptoms.

Self-injectable testosterone was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in October 2018 for men whose bodies cannot produce adequate amounts of testosterone on their own. It has not been approved for men whose testosterone levels decline as a normal part of aging.

The study involved 133 men between the ages of 18 and 75 who had testosterone deficiency with symptoms. (Low testosterone, in this case, was diagnosed at levels below 300 ng/dL.)

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Statins Before Prostatectomy Don’t Improve Erectile Function, Study Finds

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Statins Before Prostatectomy Don’t Improve Erectile Function, Study FindsTaking statins before radical prostatectomy doesn’t seem to affect erectile function after surgery, scientists report in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Prostatectomy – surgical removal of the prostate gland – is a frequent treatment for prostate cancer. Many men develop erectile dysfunction (ED) afterward.

Statins are drugs prescribed to lower LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. While they are not specifically ED drugs, research suggests that some men’s erections improve while taking them. This effect might be due to statins’ anti-inflammatory properties.

This study investigated whether taking statins before prostatectomy might help men’s erections recover after surgery.  

The researchers worked with 118 Finnish men with prostate cancer. The men were randomly assigned to take either 80 mg of atorvastatin or a placebo before their scheduled radical prostatectomy.

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Ovarian Cancer Survivors Report Lower Quality of Life

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Ovarian Cancer Survivors Report Lower Quality of LifeMany ovarian cancer survivors struggle with changes in sex and relationships, reports a recent study in Sexual Medicine.

Poor quality of life, high rates of depression, poor body image, and low relationship satisfaction were common among the women studied.

Affecting about 1 in 75 women, ovarian cancer is thought to affect women’s sexuality in different ways than other forms of gynecologic cancer. Until now, there has been little research on sexual experiences specific to ovarian cancer survivors, the authors said.

The study had two parts. First, the researchers asked 64 ovarian cancer survivors to complete a group of questionnaires designed to assess quality of life, sexual function and relationships, sexual distress, and depression symptoms.

In the second part, three women sat down with researchers and discussed their experiences with ovarian cancer and sexuality in a focus group.

Based on the questionnaire scores, the researchers found that women with ovarian cancer were more likely to have sexual problems and feel sexual distress than women in the general population. They also had higher rates of depression and were less satisfied with their relationships.

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What Should Women Know About Testosterone Therapy?

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What Should Women Know About Testosterone Therapy?Some postmenopausal women with low libido might benefit from testosterone therapy, according to recently-issued guidelines.

The “Global Consensus Position Statement on the Use of Testosterone Therapy in Women” was developed by a panel of experts to guide healthcare providers who prescribe hormonal therapy to women. The statement was endorsed by 11 medical organizations, including the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) (The Sexual Medicine Society of North America, which produces SexHealthMatters.org, is affiliated with the ISSM.)

While the news may be a step forward for women’s sexual health, the panel was very specific in its recommendations, which covered how testosterone should be measured, prescribed, and monitored.

Here are some key points from the statement:

Testosterone therapy may be recommended for women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD), but not for women with other types of sexual problems.

HSDD is a persistent lack of sexual desire that has no apparent cause. For example, it’s not a medication side effect, and it’s not a result of other health conditions associated with low libido. Another component of HSDD is distress. Women who have HSDD are bothered by their low sex drive. It might cause stress in their relationship, or they might miss the intimacy they once shared with a partner.

Testosterone therapy may be recommended for postmenopausal women, but not premenopausal women.

The menopause distinction is important. Currently, scientists don’t have enough information to recommend the use of testosterone in women who have not gone through menopause.

During menopause, a woman’s estrogen levels decline, and she stops having menstrual periods. Testosterone levels decline, too.

Women are considered to be postmenopausal (finished with menopause) when they have gone 12 months without a menstrual period. Before this benchmark, periods may be irregular, and many women think they have finished menopause when in fact they haven’t. Women who are unsure of their menopausal status should talk to their gynecologist.

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